People with Disabilities

logo "The IAP Your Accessibility Podcast"

In this episode:

The Interactive Accessibility Podcast (IAP) is an entertaining approach to accessibility. We enjoy sharing our discussions on accessibility and how it relates to technology, real-life issues, information, businesses, and people with disabilities.

This story warmed our hearts here at IA. Kudos to Microsoft, SAP and all 50 of the big-name companies that came together for the April summit on how to bring more autistic adults into the workforce and recognizing the talents of those with autism.
Read or watch the CBS Story, “The growing acceptance of autism in the workplace.”

IAP 2018-E1: Aira: Hands-free Assistance for People with Vision Loss

In this episode: Jeremy and Mark talk about the Aira service that uses wearable glasses technology and remote assistance to help people with vision disabilities with, well, almost anything.

The Interactive Accessibility Podcast (IAP) is an entertaining approach to accessibility. We enjoy sharing our discussions on accessibility and how it relates to technology, real-life issues, information, businesses, and people with disabilities.

IAP 2017-E5: Darren the Guide Dog

In this episode:

Co-host Mark Miller, who is sited, takes co-host Jeremy Curry’s guide dog, Darren, for a mismatched and confusing walk across a busy Chicago street. Learn a bit about the unique relationship between a guide dog and their owner through the story of this little misadventure.

GAAD Logo

As you may have guessed from the title, today is Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD)! If you don’t know what GAAD is, it is “to get everyone thinking and learning about digital (web, software, mobile, etc.) access/inclusion and people with different disabilities.”  And, if you are coming to our site to learn about accessibility, you are in the right place!  Interactive Accessibility is known globally for being the experts in digital accessibility.

Did you know there are only about 10,000 guide dogs in the United States? With only 0.003% of the population using a guide dog, it is understandable that people do not know how to react to a service animal. Whether it is an adult or a curious toddler, I’m often the focus of attention everywhere I go.  Many times, the public seems to forget all manners and yell out “Dog! Dog!” or “Puppy!

UMass Boston’s engineering students have collected a year’s worth of Wi-Fi signal data to create a map of the campus. Using the IBM Accessible Location-based Service, people with disabilities will be able to download an app on their mobile device and identify their location using the Wi-Fi signals. They can then put in a destination and the app will guide them, turn-by-turn, and give accessible route guidance based on the current physical campus environment.

This technology has great potential for other environments such as airports, hospitals, office buildings and shopping malls. It could benefit many people such as:

  • Firefighters
  • The elderly
  • People with short term memory issues
  • People with vision disabilities

Read Dr. Ping Chen’s article on GAAD. 

A Texas A&M University biomedical engineering researcher is developing a device that, while worn on the wrist, translates sign language into text. The wearable tech uses motion sensors in conjunction with measurements of electrical activity in the muscles to interpret gestures.  It can already recognize 40 American Sign Language (ASL) words with an approximate 96 percent accuracy. This gives great promise that the device could bridge the communications delta between people who are deaf and those who don’t know ASL.

For more information see the GAATES article.  

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