WCAG 2.0

The Accessibility Guidelines Working Group has published Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1 as a W3C Recommendation at:

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG21/

The document received broad support from the W3C Advisory Committee and the W3C Director approved the transition to Recommendation. That means it is a stable standard ready for general implementation.W3C encourages organizations and individuals to review and update their policies to reflect the updated guidance provided by WCAG 2.1, in order to address more user needs in their websites.

All requirements (“success criteria”) from 2.0 are included in 2.1. There are additional success criteria in 2.1. They are introduced in "What's New in WCAG 2.1" at:

https://www.w3.org/WAI/standards-guidelines/wcag/new-in-21/

More information about this publication and next steps is in the blog post:

https://www.w3.org/blog/2018/06/wcag21-rec/

More information about the Accessibility Guidelines Working Group is available from:

https://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/

Evaluating a product for accessibility can be challenging. How do you know a product is really accessible? What can you do to verify the information in a VPAT®?

®

VPAT® stands for Voluntary Product Accessibility Template®. Organizations request VPAT®s for products to determine if it is accessible but how do you know if that information is correct and if the product is really accessible. In this session you will learn what a VPAT® is and what you can do to evaluate a product to see if it meets the Section 508 standards and WCAG 2.0 guidelines.

Our thought leadership and expertise in accessibility is internationally-recognized and we leverage it to help you lead your industry, reach new audiences, gain opportunities and reduce legal exposure.

Interactive Accessibility will help you understand the laws for website and web application accessibility.

A draft of WCAG 2.1 that includes content through the latest CfCs accepted this week has been published. WCAG 2.1 adds new success criteria to expand coverage users of mobile devices, people with cognitive or learning disabilities, and people with low vision. Most success criteria are complete, but some are still under discussion.

According to the timeline, this is meant to be the final draft before entering CR. Messaging about this is available at: Final WCAG 2.1 Working Draft

Understanding content for this draft is available.

Tim Berners-Lee, director of the W3C and inventor of the World Wide Web, thanked and encouraged fellow Web technologists to sustain his original vision of an open, interoperable and decentralized Web for everyone in the world in his keynote speech at the Technical Plenary and Advisory Committee (TPAC) in Lisbon, Portugal last week. Moreover, topping the technical discussions of the groups chartered by W3C regarding advancements to the Open Web Platform and industry requirements for the next generation of the Web was Accessibility.

Currently WCAG 2.0 is the standard for Web sites and has been adopted globally by many governments and organizations. Next steps around expanding features and chartering new work for WCAG 2.1 by 2017 were discussed.   This includes providing and even more robust horizontal review of all W3C standard with the goal of ensuring accesses for everyone. Also, ARIA 1.1 is ready to advance to Candidate Recommendations and is evaluating implementations.

For more on TPAC read GAATES article, “W3C Global Web Experts Plan Technical Roadmap for Future of Web.” 

The Department of Justice (DOJ) is collecting comments on the importance of web accessibility for people across the country who have disabilities. They are focusing on state and local government websites that cover things like voting, emergency preparedness, public schools and other government services. Comments are due on October 7, 2016. For information on when and how to file comments see the blog post on the Law Office of Lainey Feingold website.

Websites can be made more accessible by conforming to the WCAG 2.0 Level AA guidelines put forth by the W3C. For more information on how to conform to these guidelines visit the Service section of the Interactive Accessibility website.

Following the announcement that the regulations for web accessibility proposed by the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) in 2010 under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) will be further delayed, the National Federation of the Blind (NFB) has condemned the delay. While the rule making has been delayed, many companies and organizations are choosing to conform to the WCAG 2.0 Level AA guidelines for Web Accessibility in advance of the final rule making. 

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